Tag Archives for " #SQL "

Update an IBM i file with SQL cursor using SQLRPGLE WHERE CURRENT OF

Using SQL in RPGLE programs is easier than you think. Making the move from RPG native file IO to SQL database IO is really quite straightforward.  Changing from good old READE loops to SQL FOR Loops simply means using the SQL CURSOR function. SQL has a groovy way of referring to what the stuff that […]

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RPG, PHP and MYSQL

I wish I could take credit for this article. But I cant 🙂  It hits the nail on the head and the author (Daniel Gray) explains himself very clearly: Getting up to speed with PHP on the IBM I If I can, I’d like to offer my IBM I friends some advice on getting up […]

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Replace IBM i Native File Access with SQL

I found this excellent article by Birgitta Hauser, Software and Database Engineer, Toolmaker Advanced Efficiency GmbH. It covers the basic concepts you will need to consider if you want to “Replace IBM i Native File Access with SQL” Just in case it vanishes I’m going to reproduce it here: If you are considering SQL and […]

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RPG Example reading JSON using YAJL from IFS

Decode JSON webservice reply data (already stored in IFS) using YAJL This reads the JSON from the IFS – decodes it using Y.A.J.L and reports on time taken to perform decode. Writing an RPG program to read JSON using YAJL is actually pretty straightforward — I hope this code example helps! In this case the […]

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Change Case in RPG – UPPER to lower using XLATE vs. SQL

Changing SENTENCE CASE didnt used to be something that the grey haired AS400 and iSERIES programmers ever worried about. Back in the pre-internet days, most data entry was in UPPERCASE, plugged into giant green on black terminals by people wearing 1970’s flares and thick glass spectacles. But now it’s a new age of Internet connectivity, […]

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RPGLE and SQLRPGLE – The dreaded USRPRF(*OWNER) conundrum

How does USER(*OWNER) work with RPGLE Programs? If you compile IBM i programs using USRPRF(*OWNER) then they will adopt the security setting for the program owner at runtime. #sometimes If you are calling an IBM i SQL program, that has been compiled with USRPRF(*OWNER) you may find that it does NOT adopt the security setting. […]

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